ISO 45001:2018 Clause 6: Planning

Clause 6 describes the actions necessary to address risk and opportunity. Activity planning must take place within the context of the organization. The planning process must ensure that the OH&S management system is designed to achieve its intended outcomes and continually improve. Worker participation is cited as being a critical component in the planning phase. Additional considerations include operational risk, legal requirements, and other opportunities to improve the OH&S management system. This section outlines the need for hazard identification by the organization for both routine and non-routine activities, emergency situations, people and behavior, work area design, work environment under the control of the organization, and situations not under organizational control. Additional points of assessment include changes to process and operations, past incidents and their causes, and social/economic factors. The major sub-sections in Clause 6 include:

  1. Hazard Identification
  2. Assessment of OH&S Risks
  3. Identification of OH&S Opportunities
  4. Determination of Legal Requirements
  5. Planning to Take Action
  6. The setting of OH&S Objectives
  7. Planning to Achieve Objectives

The planning phase is a comprehensive part of the ISO 45001 standard, requiring a detailed understanding of operations. By following this section, the organization can create a very deliberate and effective set-up to sustain the OH&S management system and ensure it continually improves. This is one of the most critical clauses since it is related to the establishment of strategic objectives and guiding principles for the Occupational Health and Safety Management System as a whole. The OH&S objectives, which can be integrated with other business functions, are the expression of the intent of the organization to treat the risks identified. When determining the risks and opportunities that need to be addressed, the organization shall take into account:

  • OH&S hazards and their associated risks, and opportunities for improvement;
  • Applicable legal requirements and other requirements;
  • Risks and opportunities related to the operation of the OH&S Management System that can affect the achievement of the intended outcomes.

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6 Planning

6.1 Actions to address risks and opportunities

6.1.1 General

When planning for the OH&S management system, the organization must consider the relevant internal and external issues(4.1),  the needs and expectations of workers and other interested parties (4.2) and the scope of its OH&S management system(4.3) and determine the risks and opportunities. The organization must give assurance that the OH&S management system can achieve its intended outcomes, prevent, or reduce, undesired effects and achieve continual improvement. When determining the risks and opportunities to the OH&S management system and its intended outcomes that need to be addressed, the organization shall take into account its hazards; OH&S risks, and other risks; OH&S opportunities and other opportunities; legal requirements and other requirements. The organization, in its planning process, must determine and assess the risks and opportunities that are relevant to the intended outcomes of the OH&S management system associated with changes in the organization, its processes or the OH&S management system. In the case of planned changes, permanent or temporary, this assessment must be undertaken before the change is implemented. The organization must record its risks and opportunities; the processes and actions needed to determine and address its risks and opportunities to the extent necessary to have confidence that they are carried out as planned.

As per Annex A (Guidance on the use of ISO 45001:2018 standard) of ISO 45001:2018 standard it further explains:

Planning is not a single event but an ongoing process, anticipating changing circumstances and continually determining risks and opportunities, both for the workers and for the OH&S management system.
Undesired effects can include work-related injury and ill health, noncompliance with legal requirements and other requirements, or damage to reputation.
Planning considers the relationships and interactions between the activities and requirements for the management system as a whole.
OH&S opportunities address the identification of hazards, how they are communicated, and the analysis and mitigation of known hazards. Other opportunities address system improvement strategies.

Examples of other opportunities to improve OH&S performance:

a) inspection and auditing functions;
b) job hazard analysis (job safety analysis) and task-related assessments;
c) improving OH&S performance by alleviating monotonous work or work at a potentially hazardous pre-determined work rate;
d) permit to work and other recognition and control methods;
e) incident or nonconformity investigations and corrective actions;
f) ergonomic and other injury prevention-related assessments.

Examples of other opportunities to improve OH&S performance:

  • integrating occupational health and safety requirements at the earliest stage in the life cycle of facilities, equipment or process planning for facilities relocation, process re-design or replacement of machinery and plant.
  • integrating occupational health and safety requirements at the earliest stage of planning for facilities relocation, process re-design or replacement of machinery and plant.
  • using new technologies to improve OH&S performance.
  • improving the occupational health and safety culture, such as by extending competence related to occupational health and safety beyond requirements or encouraging workers to report incidents in a timely manner.
  • improving the visibility of top management’s support for the OH&S management system.
  • enhancing the incident investigation process(es).
  • improving the process(es) for worker consultation and participation.
  • benchmarking, including consideration of both the organization’s own past performance and that of other organizations.
  • collaborating in forums that focus on topics dealing with occupational health and safety.

This clause replaced “preventive action” in the previous OHSAS18001standard. The current standard states that the organization should establish, implement, and maintain the processes needed to address the requirements of the whole of the planning section itself. When planning the OH&SManagement System, considerations need to be made regarding the context of the organization (section 4.1) and the needs and expectations of interested parties (section 4.2), as well as the scope of the OH&SManagement System.
Risk and opportunity must be considered with respect to these elements, as well as legal and regulatory issues, and the organization’s Occupational Health & Safetyhazardsthemselves. This outcome needs to ensure that the OH&SManagement System can meet its intended outcomes and objectives, that any external factors that may affect performance are avoided, and that continual improvement can be achieved.
In terms of emergency situations, the organization is required to determine any situations that may occur and have resulted in occupational health & safety risks. Again, it is vital that documented information is retained concerning the risks and opportunities considered and addressed in the planning phase in order to satisfy the terms of the clause. Planning is an integral part of all elements of an OH&S management system. Effective planning is concerned with prevention by identifying, eliminating and controlling hazards and risks. This is particularly important when dealing with health risks, which might only become apparent after a long gestation period. Planning should be a collaborative effort involving personnel throughout the organization. This co-operation is eminently suitable for demonstrating and gaining commitment to continual improvement and promoting a positive health and safety culture throughout the organization. Planning for the OH&S management system is an ongoing process and is undertaken in order:

  • To determine the risks that can affect the OH&S performance of the organization;
  • To manage these risks;
  • To identify opportunities to improve OH&S performance and the OH&S management system.

When planning for the OH&S management system, the organization should take into account the following:

  • The organization and its context;
  • The needs and expectations of workers and other interested parties;
  • The scope of the OH&S management system.

Planning should be proportionate to the level of risk identified. While the organization should consider all potential risks to its OH&S performance it should focus on those hazards which are most likely to occur and/or have the greatest impact. The company should concentrate on those opportunities that can realistically be acted upon, with priority given to those that are most likely to improve performance. Examples of opportunities to improve OH&S performance include the following:

  • Identification of hazards, how they are communicated, analyzed and controlled;
  • Enhancing the inspection and auditing functions;
  • Introduction of job safety analysis and task-related assessments;
  • Modification of working processes including the alleviation of monotonous and repetitive work;
  • Implementation of permit-to-work processes;
  • Incident or nonconformity investigations and corrective actions;
  • Implementation of ergonomic and other injury prevention-related assessments;
  • Integration of occupational health and safety considerations at the earliest stage in the design life cycle of plant and equipment;
  • Integration of occupational health and safety considerations at the earliest stage in planning for facilities relocation, and/or process redesign;
  • Introduction of new technology;
  • Improvement of the occupational health and safety culture of the organization;
  • Enhancing the visibility of top management’s support for the OH&S management system;
  • Enhancing the incident investigation process;
  • Improving worker consultation and participation;
  • Benchmarking of the organization’s OH&S performance against that of other organizations;
  • Collaborating in forums that review issues relating to occupational health and safety.

The organization must maintain documented information on:

  • Risks and opportunities;
  • The process and actions needed to determine and address its risks and opportunities to the extent necessary to have confidence that they are carried out as planned.

6.1.2 Hazard identification and assessment of risks and opportunities

6.1.2.1 Hazard identification

The organization should establish, implement and maintain processes for hazard identification that is ongoing and proactive. The organization must take into account how work is organized, social factors including workload, work hours, victimization, harassment, and bullying, leadership and the culture in the organization. The routine and non-routine activities and situations, including hazards arising from infrastructure, equipment, materials, substances and the physical conditions of the workplace; product and service design, research, development, testing, production, assembly, construction, service delivery, maintenance, and disposal; human factors; how the work is performed. The organization must consider past relevant incidents, internal or external to the organization, including emergencies, and their causes. They must also consider potential emergency situations. It must also include those people :

  1. with access to the workplace and their activities, including workers, contractors, visitors, and other persons;
  2. in the vicinity of the workplace who can be affected by the activities of the organization;
  3. workers at a location not under the direct control of the organization;

Other issues including the design of work areas, processes, installations, machinery/equipment, operating procedures and work organization, including their adaptation to the needs and capabilities of the workers involved. The situations occurring in the vicinity of the workplace caused by work-related activities under the control of the organization. The situations not controlled by the organization and occurring in the vicinity of the workplace that can cause injury and ill health to persons in the workplace. It must include actual or proposed changes in organization, operations, processes, activities, and OH&S management system; It must also include changes in knowledge of, and information about, hazards.

As per Annex A (Guidance on the use of ISO 45001:2018 standard) of ISO 45001:2018 standard it further explains:

The ongoing proactive identification of hazard begins at the conceptual design stage of any new workplace, facility, product or organization. It should continue as the design is detailed and then comes into operation, as well as being ongoing during its full life cycle to reflect current, changing and future activities.
While this document does not address product safety (i.e. safety to end-users of products), hazards to workers occurring during manufacture, construction, assembly or testing of products should be considered.
Hazard identification helps the organization recognize and understand the hazards in the workplace and to workers, in order to assess, prioritize and eliminate hazards or reduce OH&S risks.
Hazards can be physical, chemical, biological, psychosocial, mechanical, electrical or based on movement and energy.
The list of hazards given in 6.1.2.1 is not exhaustive.
NOTE The numbering of the following list items a) to f) does not correspond exactly to the numbering of the list items given in 6.1.2.1.
The organization’s hazard identification process(es) should consider:
a) routine and non-routine activities and situations:

  1. routine activities and situations create hazards through day-to-day operations and normal work activities;
  2. non-routine activities and situations are occasional or unplanned;
  3. short-term or long-term activities can create different hazards;

b) human factors:

  1. relate to human capabilities, limitations and other characteristics;
  2. information should be applied to tools, machines, systems, activities, and environment for safe, comfortable human use;
  3. should address three aspects: the activity, the worker and the organization, and how these interact with an impact on occupational health and safety;

c) new or changed hazards:

  1. can arise when work processes are deteriorated, modified, adapted or evolved as a result of familiarity or changing circumstances;
  2. understanding how work is actually performed (e.g. observing and discussing hazards with workers) can identify if OH&S risks are increased or reduced;

d) potential emergency situations:

  1. unplanned or unscheduled situations that require an immediate response (e.g. a machine catching fire in the workplace, or a natural disaster in the vicinity of the workplace or at another location where workers are performing work-related activities);
  2. include situations such as civil unrest at a location at which workers are performing work-related activities which requires their urgent evacuation;

e) people:

  1. those in the vicinity of the workplace who could be affected by the activities of the organization (e.g. passers-by, contractors or immediate neighbors);
  2. workers at a location not under the direct control of the organization, such as mobile workers or workers who travel to perform work-related activities at another location (e.g. postal workers, bus drivers, service personnel traveling to and working at a customer’s site);
  3. home-based workers, or those who work alone;

f) changes in knowledge of, and information about, hazards:

  1. sources of knowledge, information and new understanding about hazards can include published literature, research and development, feedback from workers, and review of the organization’s own operational experience;
  2. these sources can provide new information about the hazards and OH&S risks.

ISO 45001:2018 asks organizations to consider, in a proactive manner, all occupational health & safety hazards within the organization’s control. Changes or planned future changes to services also have to be taken into account, as do any abnormal situations that may arise that are reasonable for the organization to predict–for example, if you are about to launch a new product that needs radically new production processes or materials. Again, the organization needs to maintain documented information on this clause and its elements, and communication to the appropriate levels with effective frequency needs to be planned and undertaken. In terms of documented information, if you ensure that all actual and associated risks, the criteria you use to define them, and your significant occupational health & safety risks are documented, then you will satisfy the terms of this clause. The overall purpose of the risk assessment process is to evaluate the hazards that arise or might arise in the course of the organization’s activities, and ensure that the risks to people arising from these hazards are assessed, prioritized and controlled to eliminate hazards or reduce risks to acceptable levels.

Hazards have the potential to cause injury or ill health. They need to be identified before the risks associated with these hazards can be assessed and, if no controls exist or existing controls are inadequate, effective controls should be implemented according to the hierarchy of controls. Hazard identification should aim to determine proactively all sources, situations or acts (or a combination of these), arising from an organization’s activities, with a potential for harm in terms of injury or ill health. Examples include:

  • Sources (e.g. moving machinery, radiation or energy sources);
  • Situations (e.g. working in confined spaces, working at height);
  • Acts (e.g. manual handling, wearing PPE).

Hazard identification should consider the different types of hazards in the workplace, including:

  • Physical (e.g. slips, trips, and falls, entanglement, noise, vibration, harmful energy sources);
  • Chemical (e.g. inhalation, contact with or ingestion of chemicals);
  • Biological (e.g. contact with allergens or pathogens such as bacteria or viruses);
  • Psychosocial (e.g. threat of physical violence, bullying or intimidation);

The organization’s hazard identification process should take account of the following:

  • Routine and non-routine activities such as plant cleaning and maintenance, extreme weather conditions, refurbishment, and plant start-ups/shut-downs;
  • Activities of all persons having access to the workplace including contractors, visitors, and home-based workers;
  • Human behavior, capabilities and other human factors;
  • Identified hazards originating outside the workplace capable of adversely affecting the health and safety of a person under the control of the organization within the workplace;
  • Hazards created in the vicinity of the workplace by work-related activities under the control of the organization;
  • Infrastructure, equipment, and materials at the workplace, whether provided by the organization or others;
  • Changes or proposed changes in the organization or its activities;
  • Modifications to the OH&S management system, including temporary changes, and their impact on operations, processes, and activities;
  • Any applicable legal obligations relating to risk assessment and the implementation of necessary controls;
  • The design of work areas, processes, installations, machinery/equipment, operating procedures and work organization, including their adaptation to human capabilities;
  • Potential emergency situations;
  • Changes in knowledge of, and information about, hazards;
  • New or changed hazards.

Examples of items for inclusion in a hazard identification checklist:

1 Physical hazards

  • Slippery or uneven ground
  • Working at height
  • Objects falling from the height
  • Inadequate space to work
  • Poor ergonomics (e.g. workplace design that does not take account of human factors)
  • Manual handling
  • Repetitive work
  • Trappings, entanglement, burns and other hazards arising from the equipment
  • Transport hazards, either on the road or on-premises/sites, while traveling or as a pedestrian (linked to the speed and external features of vehicles and the road environment)
  • Fire and explosion (linked to the amount and nature of flammable material)
  • Harmful energy sources such as electricity, radiation, noise or vibration (linked to the amount of energy involved)
  • Stored energy, which can be released quickly and cause physical harm to the body (linked to the amount of energy)
  • Frequently repeated tasks, which can lead to upper limb disorders (linked to the duration of the tasks)
  • Unsuitable thermal environment, which can lead to hypothermia or heat stress
  • Violence to staff, leading to physical harm (linked to the nature of the perpetrators)
  • Ionizing radiation (from x- or gamma-ray machines or radioactive substances)
  • Non-ionizing radiation (e.g. light, magnetic, radio-waves)

2 Chemical hazards
Substances hazardous to health or safety due to:

  • Inhalation of vapors, gases, or particles
  • Contact with or being absorbed through, the body
  • Ingestion
  • The storage, incompatibility, or degradation of materials

3 Biological hazards

Biological agents, allergens, or pathogens (such as bacteria or viruses), that might be:

  • Inhaled
  • Transmitted via contact, including by bodily fluids (e.g. needle stick injuries), insect bites, etc.
  • Ingested (e.g. via contaminated food products)

4 Psychosocial hazards

Situations that can lead to negative psychosocial (including psychological) conditions, such as stress (including post-traumatic stress, anxiety, fatigue, depression, e.g.:

  • Excessive workload
  • Lack of communication or management control
  • Workplace physical environment
  • Physical violence
  • Bullying or intimidation

Psychosocial hazard can arise from issues external to the workplace and can impact the OH&S of  Individuals or their colleagues.

Typical operation controls could include:

  • Clarifying health and safety responsibilities and ensuring that the activities of everyone are well coordinated
  • Ensuring everyone with responsibilities understands clearly what they have to do to discharge their responsibilities and ensure they have the time and resources to discharge them effectively
  • Setting standards to judge the performance of those with responsibilities and ensure they meet them. It is important to reward good performance as well as to take action to improve poor performance
  • Ensuring adequate and appropriate supervision, particularly for those who are learning and who are new to a job
    •  Elimination (modify a design, etc.)
    • Substitution (use a less hazardous material or reduce system energy, etc.)
    • Engineering controls (ventilation systems, interlocks, etc.)
    • Administrative controls, signage, warnings (safety signs, alarms, inspections, work permits, etc.)
    • Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) (safety glasses, harnesses, respirators, gloves, etc.
  • Take account:
    • use of a hierarchy:
    • Combination of controls
    • Adapt work to an individual
    • Using measures that protect everyone, in preference to PPE
    • Typical basic types of human behavior (lapses etc.)
    • Planned maintenance
    • Lack of familiarity
  • Examples of areas in which OH&S risks typically arise, and examples of their associated control measures, include (general control measures):
    • Regular maintenance and repair of facilities, machinery.
    • Equipment to prevent unsafe conditions from developing
    • Housekeeping and maintenance of clear walkways
    • Traffic management (e.g. the management of the separation of vehicle and pedestrian movements)
    • Provision and maintenance of workstations
    • Maintenance of the thermal environment (temperature, air quality)
    • Maintenance of the ventilation systems and electrical safety systems
    • maintenance of emergency plans
    • Policy related to travel, bullying, sexual harassment, drug, and alcohol abuse, etc.
    • Training and awareness programmes relating to the use of particular controls (e.g. permit-to-work systems)
    • Access controls
  • Occupational health:
    • Health surveillance
    • Pre-employment medical screening
    • Post-employment medicals
    • Worker support
    • Absence monitoring
    • Health promotion

EXAMPLE OF HAZARDS/RISKS ANALYSIS REGISTER

Process / Activity Hazard Likely Hazardous Incidence/ Situation Risk Involved Current Risk Control System Risk  Level High, Medium, Lower Is Risk Tolerable If No, Proposed Risk Control System
Lifting by overhead crane manually Electricity Expose to fire Fire Hazards Fire extinguishers, Electricity tripping systems, High No Fire Alarm system
Electricity Expose to live current Electric shock Coated electric cables provided, Covering for connections High No First Aid training, Electric tripping system
Break failure of the crane Falling of materials on the body Injury to body No Control High No Effective Preventive Maintenance, Helmel, Training to the operator on capacity and maintenance, Crane  Alarm System
Breaking of hook Falling of materials on the body Injury to body No Control High No Effective Preventive Maintenance, Helmel, Training to the operator on capacity and maintenance, Crane  Alarm System
Falling of jobs due to overfilling of the tote box Falling of materials on the body Injury to body No Control High No Effective Preventive Maintenance, Helmel, Training to the operator on capacity and maintenance, Crane  Alarm System
Failure of the structure of the beam Falling of structure on the body Injury to body/Death Testing of cranes by a third-party inspector High No Effective Preventive Maintenance, Helmet, Crane  Alarm System
Breaking of  lifting chain/Slipping of the chain due to improper clamping Falling of materials on the body Injury to body No Control High No Replacement of chain by Continuous chain, Effective Preventive Maintenance, training to Operator, Crane Alarm System

Internal OH&S risk  and Hazardous assessment guidelines

The term risk assessment appears in many different sets of Regulations: Control of Substances Hazardous to Health, Management of Health & Safety at Work, Manual Handling, Display Screen Equipment, Fire Safety, Noise, Vibration, etc. The process referred to in all of these pieces of legislation is identical. The aim of any risk assessment is to prevent accidents and injury. It requires all employers to examine their processes, equipment, workplaces and work practices to highlight where the potential for accidents
exists. Once the hazards (anything which has the potential to cause harm) are identified, the risk assessment requires the employer to evaluate the risk. This involves looking at the hazard and considering how likely it is that it will cause injury as well as the possible severity of the injuries which could be caused. This is by no means an exact science, but by completing an assessment risks can be identified as high, medium and low, which will allow priorities to be set for improvements.

  • Identify the hazards – in relation to processes or the workplace.
  • Identify who is at risk – consider employees and others.
  • Identify any existing controls – have people been trained?
  • Evaluate the risk – consider possible likelihood and severity.
  • Take action to reduce the risk of accidents – consider long and short term action.
  • Record all findings.
  • Review – if there are any changes.
  • Monitor – have improvements been implemented? If yes, have they worked?

The process is always the same. However, the actual specific items examined will differ depending on the type of risk assessment being completed. Managing Health & requires a general risk assessment of all work operations. From these more, specialist risk assessments will flow.

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The organization must strive to carry out suitable and sufficient assessments of the OH&S risks to the health and safety of our employees. The significant findings of the assessments have to be recorded along with details of any groups of employees identified as being especially at risk. The contents of the assessments will be reviewed:

  • If there is a reason to suspect that they are no longer valid.
  • If there has been a significant change in the matters to which they relate
  • Every three years if no review has occurred in the interim

The organization is required to provide information to employees on the results of the risk assessments. The information has to be comprehensible and relevant to: –

  • The risks to their health and safety identified by the assessments.
  • The preventative and protective.measures being taken by management to reduce or eliminate these risks.
  • The identity of the competent persons nominated to implement H&S procedures and any other procedures to be followed in the event of serious and imminent danger.
  1. Identifying Hazards

When seeking out and identifying hazards, adequate information is necessary and reference should be made to relevant sources such as:

  • Legislation and approved codes of practice
  • Health and Safety regulators (DOSH) Guidance
  • Product information – manufacturer guidance
  • Personal knowledge of managers, colleagues, and safety representatives
  • Accident records
  • Expert advice

In the simplest cases, hazards can be spotted by observation and questioning. They may be identified by individual activities, people or work areas depending on the nature of the areas being assessed. Some tasks may be undertaken by several people in the same department, so an assessment covering the task or activities would be more appropriate than one covering each individual. Individual aspects of the people will need to be taken into account i.e. one person maybe 5 feet tall the other 6 feet 2 inches, therefore further risks may be applicable to one employee rather than the other.

2. Identify Those At Risk

In most cases, the person at risk will be the person actually involved in the work. It is, however, important to remember third parties including members of the public who could be affected by the hazard.

3. Are There Any Existing Controls?

Are there any existing controls which are already helping to reduce the risk of injury?

e.g. Have employees been trained? Is PPE worn? Are warning signs displayed?

Remember to include only those existing controls which are working efiectively. If you know that face masks are available, but they are not worn or are not suitable, then this is not an existing control measure.

4. Evaluating the Risk

Evaluating the risk involves judging the likelihood and the severity of the harm that may arise as a result of the hazard. Some risks will be insignificant either because the likelihood is very low, or because the severity of the injury is very low, or both.

Risk = Hazard Severity X Likelihood of Occurrence

A scoring system will be used to help in this process and is an essential part of a risk assessment.

5. Decide On Measures

The measures, which will be required to minimize or remove risk, need to be considered by applying a hierarchy of risk control measures. This is the important part of every risk assessment; as it is here where we are required to take action to reduce the risk of injury.

  1. Eliminate the Risk i.e. Is it possible to stop using the chemical or piece of equipment?
  2. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) — Effective if not costly
  3. Discipline
  4. Substitute i.e. Can we use a less hazardous substance?
  5. Engineering Controls at Source i.e. Guards and safety devices
  6. Re-design workplace of task
  7. Safe Systems Of Work i.e. Staff Operating Procedures which are communicated
  8. Training & Supervision — if employees are trained supervision will be needed to ensure the training is followed
  9. Warning Signs – these do not eliminate the risk but do raise awareness
  10. Maintenance of equipment – to prevent accidents from using defective equipment
  11. Good Housekeeping – having clear routes, safe storage

This is by no means an exhaustive list as certain specific controls will be needed to suit certain work areas.

6. Record the Assessment

It is a legal requirement for many countries with over five employees to record their assessments. Blank forms can be found in the QESH management system document set.

7. Review / 8. Monitor

The risk assessments will need to be monitored regularly. This will be completed by the Managing Director on at least an annual basis.

Risk Evaluation – Scoring system to be used

Severity (Worst Outcome)

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Likelihood

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6.1.2.2 Assessment of OH&S risks and other risks to the OH&S management system

The organization shall establish, implement and maintain a process to assess OH&S risks from the identified hazards while taking into account the effectiveness of existing controls. The organization must determine and assess the other risks related to the establishment, implementation, operation, and maintenance of the OH&S management system. The organization’s methodologies and criteria for the assessment of OH&S risks shall be defined with respect to their scope, nature, and timing to ensure they are proactive rather than reactive and are used in a systematic way. Documented information shall be maintained and retained on the methodologies and criteria.

As per Annex A (Guidance on the use of ISO 45001:2018 standard) of ISO 45001:2018 standard it further explains:

An organization can use different methods to assess OH&S risks as part of its overall strategy for addressing different hazards or activities. The method and complexity of assessment do not depend on the size of the organization but on the hazards associated with the activities of the organization.
Other risks to the OH&S management system should also be assessed using appropriate methods.
Processes for the assessment of risk to the OH&S management system should consider day-to-day operations and decisions (e.g. peaks in workflow, restructuring) as well as external issues (e.g. economic change). Methodologies can include ongoing consultation of workers affected by day-to-day activities (e.g. changes in workload), monitoring and communication of new legal requirements and other requirements (e.g. regulatory reform, revisions to collective agreements regarding occupational health and safety), and ensuring resources meet existing and changing needs (e.g. training on, or procurement of, new improved equipment or supplies).

The organization must establish, implement and maintain a process to:

  • Assess OH&S risks from the identified hazards, whilst taking into account the effectiveness of existing controls;
  • Determine and assess the other risks related to the establishment, implementation, and maintenance of the OH&S management system.

An organization needs to apply the process of hazard identification and risk assessment to determine the controls that are necessary to reduce the risks of injury and/or ill health. The purpose of risk assessment is to address the hazards that might arise in the course of the organization’s activities and ensure that the risks to people arising from these hazards are assessed, prioritized and controlled.

This is achieved by:

  • Developing a methodology for hazard identification and risk assessment;
  • Identifying hazards;
  • Estimating the associated risk levels, taking into account the adequacy of existing controls, based on an assessment of the likelihood of the occurrence of a hazardous event or exposure and the severity of the injury or ill health that can be caused by the event or exposure;
  • Determining whether these risks are acceptable vis the organization’s legal obligations and its OH&S objectives;
  • Determining the appropriate risk controls, where these are found to be necessary;
  • Documenting the results of the risk assessment;
  • Reviewing the hazard identification and risk assessment process on an ongoing basis.

The outputs from the risk assessment process should be used in the implementation and development of other parts of the OH&S management system such as competence, operational planning and control, and monitoring, measurement, analysis, and performance evaluation.

There is no single methodology for hazard identification and risk assessment that is suitable for all organizations. Hazard identification and risk assessment methodologies vary greatly across industries, ranging from simple assessments to complex numerical methods with extensive documentation.  Individual hazards might require that different methods be used, e.g. an assessment of long term exposure to hazardous substances might need a different method from that taken for equipment safety or for assessing an office workstation. Each organization should choose the method that is appropriate to its scope, nature, and size. The chosen approach should result in a comprehensive methodology for the ongoing evaluation of the organization’s risks. Where the organization’s risk assessment uses descriptive categories for assessing severity or likelihood of harm, these should be clearly defined, e.g. clear definitions of terms such as “likely” and “unlikely” are needed to ensure that different individuals interpret them consistently.

The organization should consider risks to sensitive populations (e.g. pregnant employees) and vulnerable groups (e.g. young workers) as well as any particular susceptibilities of the individuals involved in performing particular tasks (e.g. the ability of an individual to read instructions). The risk assessment should involve consultation with, and participation by, workers and take into account legal and other requirements. Risk assessment should be conducted by personnel with competence in risk assessment methodologies and techniques and appropriate knowledge of the organization’s work activities. The organization should also consider risks which are not directly related to the health and safety of people, but which affect the OH&S management system itself and can have an impact on its intended outcomes.

Risks to the OH&S management system includes:

  • Failure to understand the context of the organization;
  • Failure to address the needs and expectations of relevant interested parties;
  • Inadequate consultation and participation of workers;
  • Inadequate planning or allocation of resources;
  • An ineffectual audit programme;
  • An incomplete management review;
  • Poor succession planning for key roles;
  • Poor engagement by top management.

6.1.2.3 Assessment of OH&S opportunities and other opportunities to the OH&S management system

The organization shall establish, implement and maintain processes to assess OH&S opportunities to enhance OH&S performance while taking into account planned changes to the organization, its policies, processes or its activities and opportunities to adapt work, work for the organization and work environment to workers. The opportunities to eliminate hazards and reduce OH&S risks and other opportunities for improving the OH&S management system. OH&S risks and OH&S opportunities can result in other risks and other opportunities for the organization.

As per Annex A (Guidance on the use of ISO 45001:2018 standard) of ISO 45001:2018 standard it further explains:

The process for assessment should consider the OH&S opportunities and other opportunities determined, their benefits and potential to improve OH&S performance.

The organization must establish, implement and maintain a process to assess:

  • OH&S opportunities to enhance OH&S performance, while considering planned changes to the organization, its policies, processes or activities;
  • Other opportunities for improving the OH&S management system.

Opportunities to improve OH&S performance can include:

  • Consideration of hazards and risks when planning and designing facilities, processes, plant and equipment, and materials;
  • Modification of working processes including the alleviation of monotonous and repetitive work;
  • Introduction of new technology to ameliorate high-risk activities;
  • Collaborating in forums that focus on issues relating to occupational health and safety.
  • Introduction of job safety analysis and task-related assessments;
  • Implementation of permit-to-work processes;
  • Implementation of ergonomic and other injury prevention-related assessments;
  • Improvement of the occupational health and safety culture of the organization;

Opportunities to improve the OH&S management system include:

  • Enhancing the visibility of top management’s support for the OH&S management system;
  • Improving worker consultation and participation in OH&S decision making;
  • Enhancing the incident investigation process;
  • Improving two-way communication on OH&S issues and promoting OH&S in the workplace;
  • Expediting corrective actions to address OH&S nonconformities;
  • Implementing OH&S objectives with the same passion as other business objectives;
  • Improving competency in identifying hazards, dealing with OH&S risks and implementing appropriate controls;
  • Adopting a risk assessment approach to conducting OH&S audits;
  • Viewing workers at all levels as a key resource of the organization;
  • Ensuring that the management review promotes a strategic and critical evaluation of the OH&S management system.

Risk / Opportunity of Internal Issues (Examples)

Sr.No Issues (Internal) Expected Result Uncertainty Risks (-ve)
Effect
Opportunity (+ve)
Effect
1 Social customs around PPE
Responsibility of OH&S
The willingness to be involved in consultation and participation
 Use of PPE
Top management shall take overall responsibility and accountability for the protection of workers, processes for consultation/ participation, establish 0H&S committees
Social custom is for workers to provide their own PPE. and be solely responsible for their OH&S. Also, the willingness to be involved in consultation and participation in a work setting is traditionally very poor Workers ignore the organizations OH&S processes, and OH&S performance does not improve Opportunity to be known in the sector as a caring and forward thinking the employer, attracting good quality human resources and inward investment from client’s (including overseas client’s) concerned with reputational impacts and good social responsibility/ governance
2 Is the organizational structure capable of ensuring adequate control for OH&S, especially when outsourcing and with the use of contractors Outsourced processes are controlled Contactor controls for communicating hazards, evaluation, and OH&S risks. The structure is very flat, with most of the workers being of low education, or the work is outsourced. Uncertainty around adequate supervision and OH&S control Poor OH&S performance affecting workers and others OH&S, reputational damage, fines, loss of customers (Not every issue will have an opportunity associated with it.
Please do not mix up risk treatment with an opportunity)

Risk / Opportunity of External Issues (Examples)

Sr Issues (External) Expected Result Uncertainty Risks (-ve)
Effect
Opportunity (+ve)
Effect
1 Cultural – risk-taking (contractors/outsourcing) Top Management promoting a culture that supports the OH&S MS
Promoting a culture supporting an OH&S Awareness of benefits of improved OH&S performance and their contribution Aware of the implications of not conforming Implementing control of the processes in accordance with the criteria Commitments in the policy to provide a safe and healthy workplace
Might be considered as part of the culture, and seen as normal practice in.
Expansion into other regions will require research into the culture affecting OH&S
OH&S MS is not effective and does not achieve it’s intended outcomes
Workers continue to adopt peer pressure norms to get the work done
Workers are injured, suffer ill health, or fatal consequences investment cost of the OH&S MS is lost
Contracts helped by having an OH&S MS may be lost due to non-adherence Other MS’s could be affected e.g. quality
(Not every issue will have an opportunity associated with it. Please do not mix up risk treatment with an opportunity)

Risk / Opportunity of Requirement for Workers Requirements (Examples)

Sr (Relevant) Requirements
 workers
Expected Result Uncertainty Risks (-ve)
Effect
Opportunity (+ve)
Effect
1 Opportunities for dialogue, improvement, and when changes occur Processes for consultation/ participation, establish OH&S committees
The policy commitment to consultation/ participation processes for consultation and participation. Ensure the participation of workers
Manager & workers traditionally do not consult or participate in OH&S matters. Time to consult/ participate and logistical arrangementsCulture with respect to OH&S importance OH&S culture does not improve OH&S performance is affected Hazards/risks are not the identified OH&S loss to workers (Not every issue will have an opportunity associated with it.
Please do not mix up risk treatment with an opportunity)

Risk / Opportunity of Requirement for Other interested Parties Requirements (Examples)

Sr (Relevant)
Requirements
(Other interested Parties)
Expected Result Uncertainty Risks (-ve)
Effect
Opportunity (+ve)
Effect
1 Contractors/suppliers/outsourcing-Clear statement of OHS requirements in tenders/ contracts Controls for procuring goods/ services conform to OH&S MS requirements OH&S requirements are not clearly defined in our contracts and demoted to a contract Annex Poor OH&S performance, and OH&S loss to workers Improving the OH&S culture by extending competence related to OH&S beyond requirements (OH&S Opportunity to improve OH&S)

6.1.3 Determination of legal requirements and other requirements

The organization shall establish, implement and maintain processes to determine and have access to up-to-date legal requirements and other requirements that are applicable to its hazards, OH&S risks and OH&S management system. The organization must determine how these legal requirements and other requirements applicable to the organization and what needs to be communicated. It must take these legal requirements and other requirements into account when establishing, implementing, maintaining and continually improving its OH&S management system. The organization shall maintain and retain documented information on its legal requirements and other requirements and shall ensure that it is updated to reflect any changes. Legal requirements and other requirements can result in risks and opportunities for the organization.

As per Annex A (Guidance on the use of ISO 45001:2018 standard) of ISO 45001:2018 standard it further explains:

a) Legal requirements can include:

  1. legislation (national, regional or international), including statutes and regulations;
  2. decrees and directives;
  3.  orders issued by regulators;
  4. permits, licenses or other forms of authorization;
  5. judgments of courts or administrative tribunals;
  6. treaties, conventions, protocols;
  7. collective bargaining agreements.

b) Other requirements can include:

  1. the organization’s requirements;
  2. contractual conditions;
  3. employment agreements;
  4. agreements with interested parties;
  5. agreements with health authorities;
  6. non-regulatory standards, consensus standards, and guidelines;
  7. voluntary principles, codes of practice, technical specifications, charters;
  8. public commitments of the organization or its parent organization.

The organization should have a process to determine and have access to health and safety legal requirements and other requirements applicable to its OHSMS and to determine how these requirements apply to the OHSMS. The organization needs to be confident that during the risk assessment process it is adhering to the latest applicable legal and other requirements. The legal and other requirements process of assessment will vary depending on the complexity of the business. Sources of information may be gathered in many ways including:

  • Subscription to publisher legal update newsletters.
  • Membership of trade associations
  • Research via reputable government websites
  • Use of competent consultants
  • Competent employee membership of occupational health and safety institutes.
  • Employee attendance of occupational health and safety training courses

Following the initial assessment of compliance obligations, the organization may consider placing the relevant information in a document. A spreadsheet may be useful for this purpose. A live document may include the following information and be referenced within individual risk assessments:

  • Name and reference number of regulation/requirement.
  • Revision status
  • The date the regulation was last reviewed
  • The competent person responsible for reviewing the requirement
  • Area of the organization the requirement impacts including a short description of the activity and associated documented information
  • A hyperlink or description of the source of information
  • Name and customer / external provider contact details if relevant to ‘other requirement’
  • Next review date

The process should cover:

  • What are the organization’s legal and other requirements and how are they determined, accessed and kept up-to-date;
  • How do these legal and other requirements applicable to the organization’s activities, processes, plant & equipment, workforce, hazard profile & associated OH&S risks, the overall OH&SMS, and its OH&S performance;
  • How these legal and other requirements are taken into account when establishing, implementing, maintaining and continually improving the organization’s OH&S management system.

Legal requirements could include:

  • Acts and statutory instruments such as the Safety, Health, and Welfare at Work Act 2005 and the Safety, Health and Welfare at Work (Chemical Agents) Regulations 2001;
  • Licenses, permits and other forms of authorization such as the EPA Office of Radiological Protection license or Seveso establishment notification;
  • Improvement or prohibition notices issued by HSA/HSE;
  • EU Directives or Regulations.

Other requirements could include:

  • Parent company protocols or policies;
  • Collective bargaining agreements;
  • Voluntary adherence to sector or trade body guidance documents;
  • Contractual conditions;
  • Employment agreements;
  • Voluntary principles, codes of practice, technical specifications, charters;
  • Public commitments of the organization or its parent company.

The organization must ensure that relevant workers know how to access information on legal and other requirements that are applicable to them. The organization is required to maintain and retain documented information on this process. This will ensure that the information is updated to reflect any changes to the organization’s health and safety profile. The organization must decide what legal and other requirements are related to its occupational health & safety hazards and how to best access them, decide how they apply to the organization, and take them. into consideration when establishing, operating, and delivering continual improvement through the OH&S Management System. Documented evidence needs to be recorded for these obligations, also.

6.1.4 Planning action

The organization shall plan actions to address these risks and opportunities; legal requirements and other requirements. It must prepare for and respond to emergency situations. It must also plan actions to integrate and implement the actions into its OH&S management system processes or other business processes. The organization must evaluate the effectiveness of these actions. The organization shall take into account the hierarchy of controls and outputs from the OH&S management system when planning to take action. When planning its actions, the organization shall consider best practices, technological options, and financial, operational and business requirements.

As per Annex A (Guidance on the use of ISO 45001:2018 standard) of ISO 45001:2018 standard it further explains:

The actions planned should primarily be managed through the OH&S management system and should involve integration with other business processes, such as those established for the management of the environment, quality, business continuity, risk, financial or human resources. The implementation of the actions taken is expected to achieve the intended outcomes of the OH&S management system.
When the assessment of OH&S risks and other risks has identified the need for controls, the planning activity determines how these are implemented in operation (see Clause 8); for example, determining whether to incorporate these controls into work instructions or into actions to improve competence. Other controls can take the form of measuring or monitoring (see Clause 9).
Actions to address risks and opportunities should also be considered under the management of change (see 8.1.3) to ensure there are no resulting unintended consequences.

The organization should ensure that specific plans are in place to:

  • Address risks and opportunities that have been assessed as requiring further action;
  • Address legal and other requirements;
  • Prepare for and respond to emergency situations.

In this clause, the standard states that the organization shall plan to take actions to address its occupational health & safety hazards, risks, and opportunities, and compliance obligations, all of which we have discussed above. These also need to be implemented into the organization’s OH&SManagement System and associated business processes. The task of evaluating the effectiveness of these actions also must be considered, with technological, financial, and operational considerations all taken into account. The actions planned should primarily be managed through the OH&S management system and where appropriate should involve integration with other business processes and/or management systems such as quality, environment, business continuity, risk management and financial or human resource management. When planning to take action the organization should take into account the hierarchy of controls common to risk management, which is detailed in section 8.1.2 of the standard and outputs from the OH&S management system. The actions planned can include establishing objectives (reference section 6.2 of the standard) or incorporating the action into other OHSMS processes such as documented procedures or improved competence. Actions to address risks and opportunities should also be considered under clause 8.1.3: management of change to ensure that there are no unintended consequences arising from the actions taken. Finally, the organization needs to evaluate the effectiveness of these actions.

Category Identified need: Actions required: How to:
Address risks and opportunities OH&S MS – The willingness to be involved in consultation and participation in a work setting is traditionally very poor. Workers might ignore the organizations OH&S processes, and OH&S performance does not improve. Top management is to demonstrate their commitment to the OH&S MS and those involved with it. Monthly OH&S committees are to be set up with top management involvement. All workers will be invited to select their representatives at the committees. Meeting minutes will be published with actions to improve OH&S performance. All suggested improvements will be considered before a decision is made. All OH&S MS decisions that need to be made will involve consultation with the workers before the decision is made. All decisions in the OH&S MS will be transparent. Time, training, the resource will be made available for consultation and participation. Integrate- Business processes will be updated to include the actions stated.
Implement into OH&S MS or other
processes-Production Director is tasked to implement these actions within 3 months (from last management review).
Evaluate effectiveness – This will be through the first OH&S Committee scheduled in two months’ time.
Other Consideration – Operational and
business requirements and constraints.

6.2 OH&S objectives and planning to achieve them

6.2.1 OH&S objectives

The organization shall establish OH&S objectives at relevant functions and levels in order to maintain and continually improve the OH&S management system and OH&S performance. The OH&S objectives must be consistent with the OH&S policy. The objectives must be measurable (if practicable) or capable of performance evaluation. It must take into account

  1. applicable requirements;
  2. the results of the assessment of risks and opportunities;
  3. the results of consultation with workers, and, where they exist, workers’ representatives;

The objectives must be monitored, communicated and be updated as appropriate.

As per Annex A (Guidance on the use of ISO 45001:2018 standard) of ISO 45001:2018 standard it further explains:

Objectives are established to maintain and improve OH&S performance. The objectives should be linked to risks and opportunities and performance criteria which the organization has identified as being necessary for the achievement of the intended outcomes of the OH&S management system.
OH&S objectives can be integrated with other business objectives and should be set at relevant functions and levels. Objectives can be strategic, tactical or operational:
a) strategic objectives can be set to improve the overall performance of the OH&S management system (e.g. to eliminate noise exposure);
b) tactical objectives can be set at facility, project or process level (e.g. to reduce noise at source);
c) operational objectives can be set at the activity level (e.g. the enclosure of individual machines to reduce noise).

The measurement of OH&S objectives can be qualitative or quantitative. Qualitative measures can be approximations, such as those obtained from surveys, interviews, and observations. The organization is not required to establish OH&S objectives for every risk and opportunity it determines.

The organization should establish objectives in order to maintain and improve the OH&S management system and to achieve continual improvement in its OH&S performance.

When determining its OH&S objectives the organization must take into account:

  • The results of the assessments of risk and opportunities;
  • Applicable legal and other requirements;
  • The results of consultation with workers and where applicable, their representatives.

OH&S objectives can be integrated with other business objectives such as quality or environment and should be set at relevant functions and levels as defined and decided upon by the organization.

The OH&S objectives should address both broad corporate OH&S issues and OH&S issues that are specific to individual functions and levels within the organization. It is a requirement of the standard to set achievable OH&S objectives with the means to periodically measure progress, demonstrating continuous improvement. Often objectives are set and reviewed at management review or locally at departmental or committee meetings. Once set, there must be a means to communicate objectives throughout the organization to support and generate a positive OH&S culture. If many requirements have been identified the organization may consider developing a documented Occupational Health and Safety Strategic Plan. The plan should be agreed on by senior leadership and include risk rating tasks, in order of priority, and the alignment with senior leadership responsible for overseeing the task.

The standard advises that occupational health & safety objectives should be established at appropriate levels and intervals, having considered the identified occupational health & safety hazards, risks and opportunities, and compliance obligations. The characteristics of the set objectives are important, they need to be consistent with the organization’s Occupational Health & safety policy, measurable where possible, able to be monitored, communicated effectively, and be such that they can be updated when circumstances require. Once more, it is mandatory that documented information is kept outlining this process and its outputs. Because the term “maintain and improve its OH&S management system” is used in this clause, the organization can set some objectives in order to maintain a certain level of performance and can set other objectives for the purpose of achieving an improvement in its OH&S performance. This means that in the case of the former, once a level of performance has been achieved and no further opportunity for improvement can be identified, the organization can set an objective that maintains that set level of performance until such time as new opportunities are identified. The OH&S objectives should be consistent with the OH&S policy and if practicable, be measurable or capable of performance evaluation. Ideally, the objectives should be specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and time-oriented (SMART).

Typical examples of OH&S objectives include the following:

  • Objectives to increase or reduce a numerical value such as reducing manual handling incidents by 10% or increasing VDU risk assessments by 20%.
  • Objectives to introduce controls or eliminate hazards such as the introduction of LEV in a particular process or elimination of a particular hazardous substance from a process;
  • Objectives to introduce less hazardous materials in specific products;
  • Objectives to increase levels of worker satisfaction in relation to OH&S such as a reduction of workplace stress or an increase in worker participation in and consultation on OH&S issues;
  • Objectives to increase awareness or competence in performing work tasks safety;
  • Objectives to meet legal requirements prior to their enactment.

The objectives should be monitored, communicated and be updated as appropriate. The organization is not required to establish OH&S objectives for every risk and opportunity it determines.

6.2.2 Planning to achieve OH&S objectives

When planning how to achieve its OH&S objectives, the organization must determine:

  1. what will be done?
  2. what resources will be required?
  3. who will be responsible?
  4. when it will be completed?
  5. how the results will be evaluated, including indicators for monitoring?
  6. how the actions to achieve OH&S objectives will be integrated into the organization’s business processes?

The organization must maintain and retain documented information on the OH&S objectives and plans to achieve them.

As per Annex A (Guidance on the use of ISO 45001:2018 standard) of ISO 45001:2018 standard it further explains:

The organization can plan to achieve objectives individually or collectively. Plans can be developed for multiple objectives where necessary. The organization should examine the resources required (e.g. financial, human, equipment, infrastructure) to achieve its objectives. When practicable, each objective should be associated with an indicator which can be strategic, tactical or operational.

6.2.2 Planning to Achieve OH&S Objectives

The standard advises on the elements that need to be determined to ensure that objectives can be achieved. This can be thought of in terms of what needs to be done, when it needs to be done by, what resources are required to achieve it, who is responsible for the objectives being achieved, how results are to be measured and progress ensured, and consideration on how these objectives can be implemented within existing business systems. In order to achieve the objectives, a programme or programmes should be established. A programme is an action plan for achieving one or all of the OH&S objectives. The programme, at a minimum, should address the following:

  • What is to be done;
  • What resources (e.g. financial, human, equipment & infrastructure) will be required;
  • Who will be responsible;
  • When it will be completed;
  • How the results will be evaluated, including indicators for monitoring.

The programme should be reviewed at planned intervals, and adjusted as necessary, to ensure that the objectives are achieved. This review can be part of the management review process. The organization must maintain and retain documented information on the OH&S objectives and plans to achieve them.

A strategic OH&S plan is a live document and periodically should be reviewed to monitor progress to achieving objectives and continuous improvement. The document may include:

  • Strategic prioritized topic
  • Action, this could be conducting assessments according to compliance obligations such as a noise assessment
  • The method in which the action can be achieved
  • Resources required to achieve the action. For example human, equipment, financial and external provider expertise
  • The key performance indicator to demonstrate achievement of the action
  • General responsibility
  • Top Management responsibility
  • Timescale
  • Risk rating (order of priority)

Examples for Objectives

OH&S Policy/Risk Area  OH&S objectives Target Times-Frames Legal and other requirements Programs and other responsibilities
Prevention of Injury and ill health Number of non-reportable
Accidents per yearNumber of Reportable
Accidents per yearIncident Frequency Rate
≤10

≤2

≤20

I Year

I Year

1 Year

Health and Safety at Work Act

Management of Health and Safety
at Work Regulations

Reporting of Injuries, Diseases
and Dangerous Occurrences
Regulations

Control of Substances Hazardous
to Health (Amendment)
Regulations

Electricity at Work Regulations
Health and Safety (Safety Signs
and Signals) Regulations

Manual Handling Operations
Regulations

Incidents to be monitored quarterly. Action: Production Supervisor (PS) 

 

Any increases in incident rates to be investigated and action taken. Action: ALL Managers

 

Reduction in incident levels to be targeted through training &
monitoring programmes. Action: ALL  Managers

Example of Derivation of Objectives from Risk and Opportunity

Sr (Relevant)
Requirements
(Other interested Parties)
Expected Result Uncertainty Risks (-ve)
Effect
Opportunity (+ve)
Effect
1 Contractors/suppliers/outsourcing-Clear statement of OHS requirements in tenders/ contracts Controls for procuring goods/ services conform to OH&S MS requirements OH&S requirements are not clearly defined in our contracts and demoted to a contract Annex Poor OH&S performance, and OH&S loss to workers Improving the OH&S culture by extending competence related to OH&S _beyond requirements (OH&S Opportunity to improve OH&S)

OH&S objectiveOHS/Contractor (Sept 15th 20xx): To include a clear statement of OHS requirements in tenders/contracts. To be included by the end of Dec XX.

(What will be done)

  • Workers’ Representative, Purchasing Supervisor, H&S Manager: To drafl a statement of OH&S requirements to be included in tenders/contracts. (Before the end of September 20xx)
  • Production Manager: To review/revise in consultation with the above. (Before Oct 15th 20xx)
  • Company Secretary: To forward agreed requirements to company legal advisor for inclusion into the contract, or amendment as legally required/advised. (Before Oct end 20xx)
  • Purchasing Managers: To include new tenders/contracts. (Before Nov end 20xx)
  • Purchasing Manager: To start negotiating changes to existing contracts to include the above OH&S requirements. (On-going, but expected completion of all existing contracts by April 20xx)
  • Production Manager: To communicate new requirements for all company workers who may be involved with contractors. (Before Nov)
  • Purchasing Manager: To monitor the response from the contractor’s top management on the new requirements in tenders/contracts. (From Nov 20xx onwards)

(What resources will be required)

  • Workers Representative
  • Purchasing Manager
  • Purchasing Supervisor
  • H&S Manager
  • Company Secretary
  • Company legal Advisor
  • Time and cost for legal advice (KWD 500)

(Who will be responsible) Purchasing Manager and Production Manager.

(When it will be completed) Over the next four months (April 20xx+l).

(How it will be measured through indicators (if practicable) and monitored, including frequency). Through the dates and responsibilities identified above, and reported through the monthly OH&S committee meetings.

(How the results will be evaluated) Through the Purchasing Manager requesting if OH&S requirements are now clear in contracts (sample contractors’ management), and thereafter the Purchasing Supervisor monitoring of conformance against contract OH&S requirements (number of contract OH&S breaches/month).

(How the actions to achieve OH&S objectives will be integrated into the organization’s business processes) Actions will be integrated into each responsible person’s personal appraisal for the year and reviewed as part of their personal development and achievement.

…………………………………End of Examples …………………………………………

 

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